Cumin is one of the “4 hot seeds” and is used to relieve the digestive sphere in cases of difficult digestion, spasms, flatulence or bloating. Its properties also allow it to promote lactation and soothe engorged breasts. Latin name: Cuminum cyminum L. Plant part: seeds

This article was updated on 08/02/2023

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In case of Dyspepsia, Difficult digestion, Digestive disorders, Digestive spasms

Consume preferably after meal(s).

Recommended modes of use

In infusion

Pour the equivalent of 1/2 teaspoon, or 1.5 g of seeds per cup of hot water, then leave to infuse covered for 10 to 15 minutes. Drink 1 to 3 cups per day.

In decoction

Pour 1/2 teaspoon of seeds or 1.5 g per cup. Boil for 3 minutes. Cover then let it infuse for 10 minutes. Drink 1 to 3 cups per day.

In case of' Aerophagia, bloating, flatulence

Consume preferably after meal(s).

Recommended modes of use

In infusion

Pour the equivalent of 1/2 teaspoon, or 1.5 g of seeds per cup of hot water, then leave to infuse covered for 10 to 15 minutes. Drink 1 to 3 cups per day.

In decoction

Pour 1/2 teaspoon of seeds or 1.5 g per cup. Boil for 3 minutes. Cover then let it infuse for 10 minutes. Drink 1 to 3 cups per day.

Plants often associated

In case of' Difficult breastfeeding

Recommended modes of use

In infusion

Pour the equivalent of 1/2 teaspoon, or 1.5 g of seeds per cup of hot water, then leave to infuse covered for 10 to 15 minutes. Drink 1 to 3 cups per day.

In decoction

Pour 1/2 teaspoon of seeds or 1.5 g per cup. Boil for 3 minutes. Cover then let it infuse for 10 minutes. Drink 1 to 3 cups per day.

Plants often associated

Dill, Caraway, Fennel, Nettle, Green Anise, Hop, Fenugreek

Properties and active components

Properties

  • carminative
  • stomachic
  • antispasmodic (flavonoids)
  • galactogogue

Active components

  • Essential oils: cuminic aldehyde, pinene, alpha-terpinol
  • Flavonoids: kaempferol glycosides, quercetol
  • Furocoumarins
  • Phenolic acids

Precautions for use

No special precautions for use for this plant.

Botanical

Cumin, before being a seed, is an annual herbaceous plant of the family of Apiaceae. Its slender, fibrous roots give rise to erect stems that can reach up to 50 cm. Its leaves are alternate and cut into very thin strips. In June appear small white or pink flowers, arranged in terminal umbels.

The fruit is elongate, striated, A little sharp and gives off a powerful aromatic scent. Cumin is part of what we call the “four hot seeds”, those which act on digestion, with Caraway, Coriander and Fennel. Cumin is often confused with Caraway!

Originally from Egypt, it is today widely known throughout Europe and Asia. The world's main producer of Cumin isIndia. The ideal climate for growing Cumin is one temperate climate with a dry summer, in other words a climate mediterranean.

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Mallow (Aerial parts) ORGANIC
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Bibliography

Publication: Al-Snafi, Ali. (2016). The pharmacological activities of Cuminum cyminum -A review. IOSR Journal of Pharmacy. 6. 46-65. https://www.researchgate.net/publication/313742829_The_pharmacological_activities_of_Cuminum_cyminum_-A_review

Publication: Kori, M., Sahoo, H., Sahoo, S., Sarangi, S., & Sagar, R. (2014). Anti-diarrheal investigation from aqueous extract of Cuminum cyminum Linn. Seed in Albino rats. Pharmacognosy Research, 6(3), 204. https://doi.org/10.4103/0974-8490.132596

Publication: Sultana, A., & Rahman, K.U. (2014). Traditional Unani perspective of perceived insufficient milk (Qillatul Laban) and Galactogogues: A literary research with recent studies. TANG [HUMANITAS MEDICINE], 4(3), 19-1. http://dx.doi.org/10.5667/tang.2014.0003

Publication: Kumar, S.K.B. (2018). Comparative assessment of different herbal galactogogue preparations on milk production and economics of lactating crossbred cows. Journal of Pharmacognosy and Phytochemistry, 7(5), 2508-2512. http://www.phytojournal.com/archives/2018/vol7issue5/PartAQ/7-5-331-874.pdf

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Work : Lousse, D., Macé, N., Saint-Béat, C., & Tardif, A. (2017). The family guide to medicinal plants. Paris, France: Mango.

Work : Lieutaghi, P. (1996). The Book of Good Herbs. Arles, France: Actes Sud.

Work : Pierre, M. (2017). The bible of healing plants. Vanves, France: Editions du Chêne.

Work : Chevallier, A., & Larousse (Firm). (2014). Larousse of medicinal plants. Paris, France: Larousse.