Lemon balm is an essential aromatic medicinal plant. It is used to combat nervousness and associated disorders such as palpitations, stomach cramps, migraines and even insomnia. It is also used in cases of cold sores and ringing in the ears. Latin name: Melissa officinalis L. Part of the plant: leaves.

This article was updated on 08/02/2023

Fall for the Company

CHARM
ORGANIC bud macerate
From €6.75
picto cart
ORGANIC marjoram
Bulk plant for infusion
From €6.25
picto cart
ORGANIC Licorice
Bulk plant for infusion
From €6.00
picto cart
Organic Meadowsweet
Bulk plant for infusion
From €5.50
picto cart
Propolis honey &...
From €7.00
picto cart
ORGANIC lemon balm
Bulk plant for infusion
From €5.00
picto cart
-10% on your order, valid until sunday (june 16): PROM-1006

In case of Sleep problems, Insomnia

Recommended modes of use

In infusion

Pour 1 to 3 level teaspoons of dry leaves, or about 1.5 to 4.5 g, into a cup of hot water. Drink 2 to 3 cups per day.

In decoction

Pour 1 tablespoon of dry leaves for one cup of water. Boil for 3 minutes then leave to infuse for 10 minutes. Drink 2 to 3 cups per day.

In an aromatic bath

Make 1 L of decoction of dry leaves: finally 4 tablespoons of dry leaves to boil for 3 minutes then leave to infuse for 10 minutes. Allow to cool slightly if necessary, and add the preparation to the bath water. Stay 10 minutes.

Plants often associated

In case of Nervousness, restlessness, palpitations, anxiety, stress

Recommended modes of use

In infusion

Pour 1 to 3 level teaspoons of dry leaves, or about 1.5 to 4.5 g, into a cup of hot water. Drink 2 to 3 cups per day.

In decoction

Pour 1 tablespoon of dry leaves for one cup of water. Boil for 3 minutes then leave to infuse for 10 minutes. Drink 2 to 3 cups per day.

In an aromatic bath

Make 1 L of decoction of dry leaves: finally 4 tablespoons of dry leaves to boil for 3 minutes then leave to infuse for 10 minutes. Allow to cool slightly if necessary, and add the preparation to the bath water. Stay 10 minutes.

Plants often associated

Matricaria Chamomile, Orange Blossom, Fragrant Verbena, Melilot, Woodruff, Hawthorn, Linden (Bracts)

In case of Mild depression

Recommended modes of use

In infusion

Pour 1 to 3 level teaspoons of dry leaves, or about 1.5 to 4.5 g, into a cup of hot water. Drink 2 to 3 cups per day.

In decoction

Pour 1 tablespoon of dry leaves for one cup of water. Boil for 3 minutes then leave to infuse for 10 minutes. Drink 2 to 3 cups per day.

In an aromatic bath

Make 1 L of decoction of dry leaves: finally 4 tablespoons of dry leaves to boil for 3 minutes then leave to infuse for 10 minutes. Allow to cool slightly if necessary, and add the preparation to the bath water. Stay 10 minutes.

Plants often associated

Lavender, Horsetail, Lotter, Gentian

In case of' Herpes

Recommended modes of use

In compress

Make an infusion or decoction: 

  • Infusion: pour 1 to 3 level teaspoons of dry leaves, or approximately 1.5 to 4.5 g, into a cup of hot water.
  • Decoction: Pour 1 tablespoon of dry leaves for one cup of water. Boil for 3 minutes then leave to infuse for 10 minutes.

Filter and let cool. Soak a compress or cloth with the preparation then apply to the affected areas.

Plants often associated

Elderberry, Echinacea, Lapacho, Astragalus, Moringa

In case of Memory problems

Recommended modes of use

In infusion

Pour 1 to 3 level teaspoons of dry leaves, or about 1.5 to 4.5 g, into a cup of hot water. Drink 2 to 3 cups per day.

In decoction

Pour 1 tablespoon of dry leaves for one cup of water. Boil for 3 minutes then leave to infuse for 10 minutes. Drink 2 to 3 cups per day.

Plants often associated

Ginkgo biloba, Periwinkle, Gotu kola

In case of Dyspepsia, Difficult digestion, Digestive disorders, Digestive spasms

Recommended modes of use

In infusion

Pour 1 to 3 level teaspoons of dry leaves, or about 1.5 to 4.5 g, into a cup of hot water. Drink 2 to 3 cups per day.

In decoction

Pour 1 tablespoon of dry leaves for one cup of water. Boil for 3 minutes then leave to infuse for 10 minutes. Drink 2 to 3 cups per day.

In case of Bloating, Flatulence

Recommended modes of use

In infusion

Pour 1 to 3 level teaspoons of dry leaves, or about 1.5 to 4.5 g, into a cup of hot water. Drink 2 to 3 cups per day.

In decoction

Pour 1 tablespoon of dry leaves for one cup of water. Boil for 3 minutes then leave to infuse for 10 minutes. Drink 2 to 3 cups per day.

In case of Nausea, Dizziness, Vomiting, Motion sickness

Recommended modes of use

In infusion

Pour 1 to 3 level teaspoons of dry leaves, or about 1.5 to 4.5 g, into a cup of hot water. Drink 2 to 3 cups per day.

In decoction

Pour 1 tablespoon of dry leaves for one cup of water. Boil for 3 minutes then leave to infuse for 10 minutes. Drink 2 to 3 cups per day.

Plants often associated

In case of Nausea (pregnant women)

Recommended modes of use

In infusion

Pour 1 to 3 level teaspoons of dry leaves, or about 1.5 to 4.5 g, into a cup of hot water. Drink 2 to 3 cups per day.

In decoction

Pour 1 tablespoon of dry leaves for one cup of water. Boil for 3 minutes then leave to infuse for 10 minutes. Drink 2 to 3 cups per day.

Plants often associated

In case of Headache, Migraine

Recommended modes of use

In infusion

Pour 1 to 3 level teaspoons of dry leaves, or about 1.5 to 4.5 g, into a cup of hot water. Drink 2 to 3 cups per day.

In decoction

Pour 1 tablespoon of dry leaves for one cup of water. Boil for 3 minutes then leave to infuse for 10 minutes. Drink 2 to 3 cups per day.

Plants often associated

Properties and active components

Properties

  • antispasmodic (essential oils such as neral, citral, citronellal)
  • choleretic (tannins, essential oils, phenol acids)
  • digestive
  • carminative
  • antiulcer
  • sedative
  • anti-infectious (essential oils)
  • sudorific

Active components

  • Triterpene acids: ursolic and oleanolic acid
  • Flavonoids: derivatives of quercetol and luteolol
  • Phenol acids: rosmarinic, caffeic, chlorogenic acid
  • Essential oils: neral, geranial, citronellal, beta-caryophyllene, germacrene D

Precautions for use

  • Melissa is slightly hypothyroid. It can interfere with thyroid function. In this case, medical advice in the event of drug treatment is necessary.
  • Only the infusion and decoction are recommended for pregnant and breastfeeding women. Medical advice is still necessary before use.

Botanical

Native to Western Asia and the countries of the Mediterranean basin, Melissa is a perennial plant with a long, trailing stem. The stem, 40 to 80 cm, is erect and more or less branched. Leaves opposite, long petiolate, ovals, embattled and embossed, are a beautiful dark green above, paler below.

The aerial parts are harvested at the beginning of summer before the flowers bloom. It is also found as a “weed” in the forest or along trails. Its leaves give off a lemony smell, hence its nickname “lemongrass”. However, lemon balm should not be confused with real lemongrass (“Cymbopogon”) with a stronger smell and very different properties.

Fall for the Company

CHARM
ORGANIC bud macerate
From €6.75
picto cart
ORGANIC marjoram
Bulk plant for infusion
From €6.25
picto cart
ORGANIC Licorice
Bulk plant for infusion
From €6.00
picto cart
Organic Meadowsweet
Bulk plant for infusion
From €5.50
picto cart
Propolis honey &...
From €7.00
picto cart
ORGANIC lemon balm
Bulk plant for infusion
From €5.00
picto cart
-10% on your order, valid until sunday (june 16): PROM-1006

Was this article helpful to you?

  

Average grade: 4.7 ( 244 votes)

Bibliography

Publication: Shakeri, A., Sahebkar, A., & Javadi, B. (2016). Melissa officinalis L. – A review of its traditional uses, phytochemistry and pharmacology. Journal of Ethnopharmacology, 188, 204-228. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jep.2016.05.010

Publication: Babulka, P. (2005). Lemon balm (Melissa officinalis L.). Phytotherapy, 3(3), 114-117. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10298-005-0084-z

Publication: Kennedy, D.O., Little, W., & Scholey, A.B. (2004). Attenuation of Laboratory-Induced Stress in Humans After Acute Administration of Melissa officinalis (Lemon Balm). Psychosomatic Medicine, 66(4), 607-613. https://doi.org/10.1097/01.psy.0000132877.72833.71

Publication: Miraj, S., Azizi, N., & Kiani, S. (2016). A review of chemical components and pharmacological effects of Melissa officinalis L. Der Pharmacia Lettre, 8(6), 229-237. https://www.scopus.com/record/display.uri?eid=2-s2.0-84973661512&origin=inward&txGid=4f7b0b14306af367058d7e709d1645ed

Work : Dubray, M. (2010). Guide to contraindications of the main medicinal plants. La Geneytouse, France: L. Souny.

Work : Fleurentin, J., Pelt, JM, & Hayon, JC (2016). Good use of healing plants. Rennes, France: Ouest-France.

Work : Corjon, G. (2018). Heal yourself with plants. Quitin, France: Jean-Paul Gisserot.

Work : Pierre, M. (2017). The bible of healing plants. Vanves, France: Editions du Chêne.

Work : Lousse, D., Macé, N., Saint-Béat, C., & Tardif, A. (2017). The family guide to medicinal plants. Paris, France: Mango.

Work : Valnet, J. (1986b). Phytotherapy: treating yourself with plants. Paris, France: Maloine SA

Work : Luu, C., & Pelt, J.M. (2016). 250 natural remedies to do yourself. Mens, France: Living Earth.

Work : Pierre, M., & Gayet, C. (2019). My 1,000 phytotherapy prescriptions (BIBLE) (French Edition) (1st ed.). Paris, France: Éditions Leduc.s.

Work : Lieutaghi, P. (1996). The Book of Good Herbs. Arles, France: Actes Sud.

Work : Fournier, PV, & Boisvert, C. (2010). Dictionary of medicinal and poisonous plants of France. Paris, France: Presses de la Cité.

Work : Melissae folium (Melissa leaf). (2019, February 6). ESCOP. https://escop.com/downloads/melissa-leaf/

Website : EMA, Committee on Herbal Medicinal Products (HMPC), (2013). Assessment report on Melissa officinalis L., folium. https://www.ema.europa.eu/en/documents/herbal-report/final-assessment-report-melissa-officinalis-l-folium_en.pdf

Website : Melissa - EurekaSanté by VIDAL. (nd). EurekaHealth. https://eurekasante.vidal.fr/parapharmacie/phytotherapie-plantes/melisse-melissa-officinalis.html